The Nutcracker

Letter #13 part 3 The Nutcraker


I don’t know how many times I performed in ballet scores of The Nutcracker from the mind of Tchaikovsky. After about the 1000th time hearing the Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy, one tends to hear this in their sleep.


As an adult, my significant other would give my best girlfriend and me tickets to go see the latest visiting troupe do the performance.


I often wondered why men found the ballet so boring. Were they not musically inclined? Did the notes not whisper sweet nothings in their mind? Were the long legs flinging in the air not a turn on? All those pretty sparkle costumes wrapped around svelte contortionist bodies unable to ignite some part of the sexual brain?


Ballet and Opera, in my world, were symphonies with visuals. Who can’t be moved hearing a harp?


What if those who prefer a good mud-wrestling match over a ballet just need a mental perspective nudge into novel culture to tie those brain connecting dendrites in new ganglia patterns? Maybe if they thought of music the same way I did, going to the ballet, would be a much more entertaining process.


I know I talked about classical music and sex in Rhythm and Sex, (Letter #13 part 1). If you are having any trouble independently moving body parts to the music, take a look at the prima ballerina of any ballet or winners of talent, pole and dancing shows. For fun, let me give you a peek into my sexually deranged mind. I have an inkling this may help you get “the gist” of the grind in a new and enjoyable way.


Follow the series of the letters, in which I will explain a logical methodology for breaking the whole into pieces you can master. (Initially by yourself, with a toy and then a partner… crawl, walk, then run.)


Start with your ears and fingers:
Listen to the first 30 seconds of Tchaikovsky’s Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy.


Link below to sheet music to visualize this while hearing it if you don’t have a copy handy. 8notes.com

https://www.8notes.com/scores/7323.asp


Practice idea number one:
Let’s start by opening the palm of your left hand and tapping the notes you hear at the time you hear them on the left hand with the right hand.


Were you able to tap in the exact same spot the whole time or did you move the point of tap around on the palm?
If you had the exacting ability to hit the same spot over and over again, amazing!


Practice idea number two:
Let’s take this rhythm challenger to the fingertips. This time, I want you to replay the first 30 seconds of the music and each time you hear a note, gently touch the tip of your index finger on your right hand to the tips of alternating fingers on the left hand.


This practice allows you to hear notes and create a pattern of movement.


Try this again with the fingertips of both hands slightly apart and when you hear the music, touch each set of corresponding fingertips to the other starting with index for the first note, middle finger for the second note, ring finger for the third note, pinky finger for the fourth note and thumb for the fifth note. The sixth note can either be the pinky and the seventh being ring finger or the sixth can be index finger with the seventh being middle finger. It all depends on how dexterous you are.


The inclination will be to use the same finger during the quick repeated notes but I want you to switch finger tip touches for every single note. I don’t need you to assign a letter of the scale for each note to a specific finger because I know you can already do that from your musical instrument training.


Those that never learned to play an instrument should learn how to assign a key per finger and enjoy figuring out which two letters overlap the five finger availability.


What I am asking you to do is a training method you can practice in public that will pay off in spades for great sex later on.

Love you,

C. Change

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Published by

coolchange2021

If I'd known these things when I was younger... Oh... the different roads I might have traveled. Its never too late to ensure a better future for someone else when good knowledge is passed around.

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